About PLAD, Inc.

Mike and Bobby from PLAD.

Cofounders, Mike and Bobby


Lift Assists and Back Injuries

In professions such as firefighting, nursing, and first responders back injuries are a common problem when performing lift assists on individuals while on the job. Statistics show that in these professions, especially within the field of Emergency Medical Services, the rate of back injuries is very high with an increasing percentage of those back injuries being career ending. These back injures not only impact these individuals lives, but there is a large resource and monetary impact from

workman's compensation claims that can cripple municipalities. Prior to the PLAD, there has not been a solution to lift assists that takes the possibility of back injuries out of the equation.


Creating a Solution to a Real World Problem

Firefighter, Mike Pannucci was finishing up medic school when he was tasked with a final project that required him to provide a solution to a current problem the industry faces and present that solution to the class. From his experience as a firefighter, he knew exactly what he wanted to base his project around and that would be the growing number of back injuries associated with lift assists. From this class, this assignment, the PLAD was conceived.


Looking for assistance to help design and fabricate a device that could safely lift an individual, Mike turned to long time friend and designer, Bobby Clark. Together, the two worked successfully on finding the right balance between a device that was extremely portable and could easily be deployed to safely and comfortably lift a person to a seated position. They went through several iterations of the PLAD until the final product that is available today got their final stamp of approval.

Saving Backs, One Lift at a Time

PLAD's main mission is to eliminate the possibility of back injuries from performing non-emergent lift assists. By creating a lifting device that is light weight and extremely portable, countless other benefits were also created in the process. In the case of firefighters, multiple teams of two no longer are required to assist in a lift where the individual weights over a certain amount. A team of two can easily deploy the PLAD and safely lift an extremely heavy individual without compromising themselves thus freeing up additional resources, which otherwise would be needed for a team lift. Commonly, when performing lift assists, it can be time consuming just trying to figure out the approach to lift the individual. With the PLAD, that guess work is a non factor because the PLAD can be deployed within a couple of minutes, which greatly shortens the time the fallen individual is in a compromising position.


Now that you are aware of the PLAD, the most portable lift assist device available, can you afford to send your team out in the field to perform a lift assist with the possibility of one of them injuring their backs? Would you perform that lift assist yourself?


We've Got Your Back,

Team PLAD